Clean Home & A Clean Martini

What is a clean home? This complicated, cultural, and even political question.  Does it have a smell? Who cleans it? How much power do the choices we make about cleaning have to change the world around us? Here at H&H we firmly believe that these choices do give you power, and we believe in wielding this power whenever possible; especially if these choices are better for the environment AND keep money in the bank.

For years I have been spending hard earned dollars on products that were either cheap and full of toxins, or all natural and quite pricey. That is, until my friend Danya asked if I wanted to join her in a diy adventure. After picking up the few items we didn’t already have, we set up shop on a recent Saturday in her magazine worthy kitchen. 

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It took no time at all to make the cleaners, and now with the right ingredients on hand, we can refill our bottles in no time when we run out. I got these glass bottles on Amazon. I’m a big fan and can recommend them for their low cost and excellent spray radius!


DIY All Natural Cleaners

The instructions for each spray are the same: using funnel, place all ingredients in bottle. Shake. Use! Shake some more. Use some more!

All Purpose Spray from Wellness Mama – OK to use on granite countertops!

  • 2 cups of distilled or boiled water
  • 1 tsp. Borax
  • 1/2 tsp. washing soda
  • 1 tsp. castille soap (Dr. Bronner’s makes lovely castile soaps)
  • 10 drops of essential oil

Floor Cleaner

  • 2 cups distilled or boiled water
  • splash of white vinegar
  • few drops of castile soap
  • few drops of essential oils

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Glass Cleaner from Whole New Mom:

  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1/4 cup rubbing alcohol
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • 2 cups water

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Danya’s spray next to her candle from the Hooch & Home candle making party!


Cleaning Up The Martini

Like many cocktails, the Martini has a much debated history. After reading up on what various sites have to offer, it seems like everyone can agree that the Martini began as the Martinez. According to Troy Patterson of Slate, the Martinez was basically a gin Manhattan. When ordered dry it would be served with dry French Vermouth instead of Italian Sweet Vermouth. Eventually the Dry Vermouth version got it’s own classification and was simplified down to a drink of stirred gin and dry vermouth. Somewhere along the way, some olive brine was added to create the Dirty Martini. In the words of Danya, this drink can taste “like an armpit” if misproportioned.

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For our clean house we wanted a clean Martini. One could debate the proportions of the classic clean Martini, but it is really a matter of taste. My bartender friend Trey says he pours vermouth over ice, and then drains the ice. He then stirs this ice with gin and serves that with an olive. Others stick to the original 1:1 ratio. I decided to go somewhere in the middle.

  • 2 1/2 oz gin (the consensus seems to be that one should use a dry gin. I used Green Hat which was all I had on hand)
  • 1 oz dry Vermouth

Stir with ice for about 20 seconds. Strain into glass (Although I recently received a beautiful jigger and bar spoon for my birthday, clearly my straining needs an upgrade!). Garnish with olive.

Turns out James Bond was a bit gauche when it came to his Martini. Stir, stir, and then stir some more.  Never shake! What are your favorite Martini proportions? Do you like to add anything extra? Are you a Martini purest?

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About hoochandhome

home improvement, one cocktail at a time
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